1. Lullaby:

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Sleep, baby, sleep

Mama’s in the bathroom

Papa’s in the shop

Mama’s wearing Makssi*

Papa’s drinking Pepesi

Sleep, baby, sleep

Sleep, baby, sleep

* A special dress which is gathered in the middrift and the lower part of the dress is lose fitting. The word maksi rhymes with pepsi.


***

2. Lullaby:


Ya-na-ya-na

I raised you when you were babies

I raised you when you where babies and that drove me crazy

Of the seven sons that I raised, not one can give me dinner nor feed me

Of the seven sons that I raised, not one can give me dinner nor feed me

Ya-na-yioneena-ya-na-yiolailiya-na-yio-naniya-na-yio-lghali

Ya-na-yioneena-ya-na-yiolailiya-na-yio-naniya-na-yio-lghali

 

***

3. Lullaby from Barka

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

I sang and sang as a bird and they heard my singing.

I sang not for happiness but for the beauty of Eid.

I sang not for happiness but for the beauty of Eid.

Today is the beginning of the tenth day before those Eid days. These days have drained my feelings like dragging my soul out of my body.

All through these days, I've been hopping my beloved was beside me coloring his hair and putting henna on his feet.

Even though left me alone with a broken heart, please my soul keep longing for him.

Oh please my soul, long for he who traveled from Sohar to al-Rustaq and left me alone, he is still my dear one, upset by the archery of a war spread across our country.

May God protect you (my country)

As the palm trees grow up again and begin to bear fruits following the war, God will return you to my country, just as you were before the war.

Today, on the beginning of the tenth day before Eid holy days, my grief grow deep and my tears fill those furrows on my face like rain in the winter time. Oh how I cried like as a baby at my darling one's departure.

I hope those times come again, then, when we were together my dear one.

Ya-na-yioneena-ya-na-yiolailiya.

When the music was played on the drums at Eid, everyone had her darling but I stayed alone with a broken heart and without my dearest.

Ya-na-yioneena-ya-na-yiolailiya.

Oh people, oh take me to Sur where there are palaces and a luxurious life.

I want to spend summer in Samail and winter in Sur.

Ya-na-yioneena-ya-na-yiolailiya

My darling is a Sheikh.

May God protect you my darling in your travels aiming to settle the disputes between the tribes.

Ya-na-yioneena-ya-na-yiolailiya

 

**********************************************

 

Sayings:

*1. Arabic 2. Translation 3. English equivalent 4. Explanation

 

مد رجولك على قد لحافك. .1
2. Cut your coat according to your cloth
4. Be satisfied and thankful with what you own.

***

لسانك حصانك أن صنته صانك .1
2. Your tongue is your guard; if you protect it you will preserve yourself.
4. This proverb means that everybody must think carefully before he or she says anything.

***

الحر تكفية الأشارة .1
2. A gesture to the wise is enough.
4. Non-verbal clues are enough for an intelligent person.

***

السماء ما تغطى بمنخل .1
2. The sky cannot be covered by a sieve.
4. Truth always appears eventually despite all efforts to hide it.

***

مثل الجني والثوم .1
2. Like the genie and garlic.
3. Oil and water don't mix
4. It is believed that if you put garlic somewhere, jinns will not go there because they hate its smell. But it means that certain people or characteristics do not go together.

***

يوم ما عرفت تلعب قالت الملعب ضيق .1
2. The day you learnt how to play the game, you said that the field was small.
3. A poor workman always blames his tools
4. This proverb is said when people blame other things for the mistakes they made, or when they try to find an excuse for a wrongful act.

***

رابع الكذاب لين رز (إلى عتبة) الباب. .1
2. Follow the liar up to his doorstep.
4. Pretend to believe the liar up to the last point.

***

العين بصيرة واليد قصيرة .1
2. The eye sees what is desired but the hand can’t reach it.
4. We don't always have things we wish in our hands.



**********************************************


Drhmi and Dinaraa

This tale, not sadness, is for you. Once upon time there was a boy and one girl who were left orphans after their mother and father passed away in an accident.
The boy was called Drhmi and the girl was called Dinaraa. They lived happily together. Drhmi sailed the seas so they lived from his catch and trade whilst Dinaraa worked hard in their home, cooking, cleaning, collecting firewood from the scrub and water from the village well.
One day Dinaraa suggested to her brother that he should marry someone, but the brother refused saying “If I marry, maybe my wife will be unkind to you.” Dinaraa smiled and replied to him “Dear brother, that won’t happened.” She insisted that he marry, over and over until in the end he agreed.
After Drhmi got married Dinaraa continued to do all the work that she had done before her brother’s marriage. Cleaning the house, collecting the wood and bringing the water. Despite all her efforts her brother’s wife grew to hate Dinaraa and plotted all day long how to get rid of her. One day the brother’s wife was sitting alone in the house when she heard a traveling salesman calling from the street with a loud voice, “Magic eggs! Humari magic eggs! Magic eggs to make a women pregnant without a husband!” On hearing this, an evil idea entered the wife’s mind. She had found the perfect way to get rid of her husband’s sister.
So, the brother’s wife bought three eggs and when Dinaraa came home from bringing water from the well her sister-in-law offered her three eggs. Dinaraa was hungry and ate the two first eggs ahppily, only just managing the third egg.
As promised by the salesman Dinaraa became pregnant.
After many days at sea Drhmi came home to find his wife troubled. She said to him, “Oh dear husband, I didn’t want to tell you but I fear sister is pregnant.” He replied, bemused “But, it’s not possible, she is not married.” His cunning wife shrugged saying “If you don’t believe me, you can check by asking her to wash your hair in the sun. Then dear husband you will see the movement of the baby in her belly.”
Drhmi did as his wife told him and there in the sunlight he saw movement, like three birds, in Dinaraa’s belly. Later the wife asked Drhmi, “And dear husband, now do you believe me? I told you she is pregnant.” Drhmi answered sadly, “I will take her far away tomorrow and leave her in the desert.”
Early in the morning of the next day Drhmi readied his donkey and said to his sister, “Dinaraa, there is someone I want us to visit.” So she prepared herself and off they went. When they had traveled in silence far into the desert, he turned away and left his sister alone without saying a word to her. His head hung low, tears in both their eyes. Drhmi went back to his wife.
Dinaraa sat there in the desert, alone and confused.
Then from nowhere, three angels on spirit steeds appeared before Dinaraa and said, “Excuse us, we want to tether our horses here.” Tearily she replied to them, “You are welcome, please tie your horses, use my hands and legs if you wish.” The angels recognized the kindness of this troubled soul.
One angel turned and asked the angle next to him, “What would you wish for her?” The second angel replied, “I wish for her, a palace made from gold and silver, manned with servants and slaves.”
Within one hour Dinaraa found herself in that palace, where she lived and gave birth to three baby birds. When the birds grew up, their mother told them to go to the coast to find their uncle Drhmi on the first day of Eid and tell him, “Our mother Dinaraa sends us to our uncle Drhmi. She wants the liver and the lung of the goat that you have slaughtered on the day of Eid. This Eid she wants her share!”
The birds went to their uncle and said what their mother had told them to say. When their uncle’s wife heard their talking she tried to chase them away. Her husband hushed her and demanded that she leave them alone.
He gave them a large part of the liver, so full of blood, and the birds flew away taking the liver to their palace.
Drhmi sat shocked, then burst from his house, following the drops of blood from the liver till he reached a huge palace in the desert. He knocked on the door. Within the palace Dinaraa heard the knocking and ordered her servants to open the doors for him. So the servants opened the first, second and the third door allowing Drhmi to enter. He walked slowly forward and on seeing his sister collapsed in shock.
His sister sat down with her brother and told him the story behind her pregnancy.
The tale has ended and twisted the bed’s ropes.